Educational Articles

What Is Natural Arch Support?

Posted By Marty Hughes, DC

Disclaimer:

The above content is for educational or informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or augment professional medical instruction, diagnosis, or treatment. Read full disclaimer here.

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Comments
April 16, 2015
Pam Wheeler

What type of people (or should I say foot) would benefit from conventional arch orthotics?

April 16, 2015
Natural Footgear

Hi, Pam,

Thank you for your message. And excellent question. I think you’ll appreciate the following video, which answers your question in detail:

www.naturalfootgear.com/blogs/education/17921600-who-should-use-orthotics

Kind regards,
Marty Hughes, DC

April 16, 2015
Vincent Brouillet

Does a metatarsal pad for treating my sesamoiditis have a similar effect as an arch support orthotic? (meaning it’s helpful for sesamoiditis but not for building natural arch strength?

I’m at a point where walking barefoot is almost painless with regards to my sesamoiditis. But I tend to walk more on the outside part of my foot by reflex. Should I still use a metatarsal pad? And for how long? And is that counterproductive for building natural arch support?

Also, metatarsal pads in conventional shoes head lead to excess pressure on the tip of my big toe (during big hikes and bike rides), felt back at the joint. What do you think?

April 16, 2015
Natural Footgear

Hello, Vincent,

Thank you for your message. By helping to return the forefoot fat pad to a position that supports and protect the sesamoids, metatarsal pads can be very helpful in promoting natural arch support. Unlike conventional arch orthotics, metatarsal pads are not rigid and do not immobilize the foot in an unnatural position.

The excess pressure you’re feeling in the tip of your big toe may be the result of wearing conventional footwear with a tapering toe box (www.naturalfootgear/blogs/education/17914828-tapering-toe-boxes). With ample room in the toe box, this problem may not occur, and it should allow the metatarsal pads to work as intended, especially if your toes are allowed to splay naturally (www.naturalfootgear.com/pages/foot-anatomy-101).

Here are a couple of articles that you might find very helpful moving forward. The first is on Sesamoiditis, and second is on Natural Arch Support.

Sesamoiditis:
www.naturalfootgear.com/blogs/education/17911740-sesamoiditis

Natural Arch Support:
www.naturalfootgear.com/blogs/education/17888744-natural-arch-support

Kind regards,
Marty Hughes, DC

January 25, 2018
Kim Calerdine

Can you tell me if custom orthotics would help with the swelling, pain, and/or cause of capsulitis (with swelling of the ball of the foot beneath the big toe and 2nd & 3rd toes)? What do you feel is beneficial for capsulitis? Thank you so much!

January 25, 2018
Natural Footgear

Hi, Kim! Thank you for your comment! In our experience, we’ve found that a natural approach to foot care can be very helpful in addressing capsulitis. First, I recommend checking out this article, which explains the various causes and symptoms of the condition and offers several non-invasive solutions that you might find useful:

www.naturalfootgear.com/blogs/education/17860972-capsulitis

One of the most effective solutions, in our experience, involves using Correct Toes toe spacers (which are, by definition, a type of toe orthotic). For most people, Correct Toes helps eliminate the need for conventional arch orthotics by enabling the main foot arch to support itself. This article, Correct Toes & Orthotics, furthers this discussion and offers a more comprehensive explanation of our natural approach:

www.naturalfootgear.com/blogs/education/17861564-correct-toes-orthotics

I hope you find this information helpful. Please let us know if you have any other questions moving forward!

All best,
Andrew Potter

October 19, 2018
Tracy S

I have worn Correct Toes for over a year on most occasions. I like the stability I get when I wear them, as I have two bunions. My right bunion is worse, and even when I have a shim in the hole of my Correct Toes, my hallux still is not fully corrected. Is this ok? And can I, over time, ever fully correct the bunion?

I now have better toe dexterity than I ever remember, and I have even been told by an orthopedic surgeon to keep wearing the Correct Toes! Thank you so much!

October 19, 2018
Natural Footgear

Greetings, Tracy!

Thank you for your comment. I’m glad to hear that you’ve made some good foot health gains by using Correct Toes to restore proper toe alignment. The cavities in the device are designed to accommodate up to three separate shims, so adding a couple more shims to your device might be helpful (we’ve found that small rectangular pieces of an old shoe insole usually make for the best shims—just FYI).

In our experience, we’ve found that most folks who have a bunion can indeed restore optimal big toe alignment and resolve the bunion over time. This depends on a number of factors, though, including how often the toe spacers are used, the kind of footwear that’s worn on a regular basis, the length of time the bunion has existed, and the responsiveness of an individual’s soft tissues to external forces, among other factors.

I hope this info helps! If you have any other questions, please do let us know.

Kind regards,
Marty Hughes, DC

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